Nineteenth-Century Disability:  Cultures & Contexts


Nineteenth-Century Disability: Cultures and Contexts is an interdisciplinary collection of primary texts and images on physical and cognitive disability in the long nineteenth century (c. 1780 to 1914). Its primary goal is to immerse users in the cultures and concepts that shaped embodied experience in the nineteenth century. Currently comprising over 50 items, the reader emphasizes the technologies, institutions, and representations in literature and popular culture that shaped ideas about disability which are still current today. You can read more about the reader and how to use it here.


Recently Added Items

  • Talking Gloves

    In 1873 Alexander Graham Bell was employed to teach George Sanders, a five year-old congenitally deaf boy. As part of his instruction of Sanders, Bell…

  • Bartola and Maximo, “The Aztec Children”

    Pedro Velasquez’s gripping 1851 Illustrated Memoir of an Expedition into Central America chronicles the enterprising Hammond expedition that…

  • The Palmer Patent Leg

    In 1846, B.F. Palmer filed the first patent for an artificial leg in the United States. His product, characterized by its smoothly articulated knee,…